Monthly Archives: February 2011

February Board Report Highlights Bond Program Activities

Bond Program Update:

OH Architecture/BacGen Technologies, our solar consultant, has been hired to help us assess our District-wide solar potential and how best to utilize our state required “1.5% for Solar” allocation. They have completed their initial district-wide solar potential inventory and summary. This phase of the work has taken into account current and projected buildings, rooftop conditions, several potential ground mount sites, solar access, probable solar production (kWh/y) and probable installation costs.  Over the next month they will integrate with the site design teams and college operations in a more detailed analysis of opportunities, and guiding strategies for the district solar investments.

Technology Solution Service (TSS), has been working on several projects under the bond program and has completed network infrastructure upgrades at both Southeast and Cascade campuses.  The VoIP (new college phone system) rollout is completed at CLIMB, PMWTC, and Southeast. Upgrades to support the VoIP system have started at Cascade. TSS standards are under review and expected to be completed in February. Research, analysis, evaluation, and meetings continue with Public Safety, Registration, TSS, and HR to develop criteria for expanding ID cards and access control.

In February the bond team will be putting out two surveys to students, staff, and faculty to obtain information in multiple areas:  food service, classroom environment and technology, wayfinding, workspace environment, student services, campus safety, district wide technology, and childcare. The survey results will inform the need for focus groups in specific areas to foster more in-depth conversations. Gathering of information from the surveys and focus groups will better inform the needs of the college and in turn the way we design and build or renovate our facilities.

Kittelson and Associates, the selected Transportation Demand Management (TDM) consultant, is drafting a final project scope that will include an extensive outreach program.  A TDM Steering Committee will be formed with representatives from the each campus as well as the many College services that have an interest in TDM.  Open Houses at each campus are planned and more. The TDM study project is expected to run to September 2011.

A new module was added to the Bond website called Public Forum. This allows anyone to ask questions or comment about the bond program without the need for the question or comment being linked to a specific story that has been posted.

Campus Updates:

Newberg:

The building is taking shape for the future Newberg Center.

Werth Blvd, the parking lot and building pad have been graded and rocked.  The south parking lot is ready for asphalt.  The concrete footings and stem walls are in place.  Radiant tubing installation is complete and the building’s concrete floor was poured in late January.  Project is currently on schedule to complete Summer 2011.

Rock Creek:

A subgroup of the Bond Internal Steering Committee held an all-day work session to continue analyzing the program and cost for the Bond work.  Four scenarios were developed by Opsis architecture.  Given the feedback from the campus in December and the previous work session, the subgroup selected one of the scenarios for further refinement by the architects.

The Bond Internal Steering Committee (BISC) reviewed the work of the subgroup and continues to work towards monitoring the program and the costs.

Next steps include planning Building 7 with the Learning Spaces group, planning Building 2 with the CTE group and working on water quality improvements and the new access/exit road to 185th.

Southeast Campus:

The team has been working on setting up various meetings for Winter term. Two workshops with the Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) will take place in February to discuss how we can build our new buildings more energy efficiently and receive incentives from ETO. Planning is underway for the campus sustainability public open house in conjunction with the Asian New Year celebration in February.

Cascade Campus:

The Bond Advisory Committee went on a tour of the Cascade Campus and its buildings, Saturday, January 8. Many in the group expressed their surprise at the depth of programming offered and the quality of the facilities. It was a good start to the outreach effort at Cascade. Programming work continues as Cascade begins to evaluate the total number of new classrooms needed relative to new faculty and student services space.

Sylvania Campus:

The E6 Dehumidification Unit installation is complete and commissioning of these units is underway.  Remaining E6 work such as paddle fan installation in the gym and filter/rack changes to the Air Handling Units at several buildings is ongoing and will continue through March 2011.

Programming discussions continue on the framework plan for renovations to the SS, ST, and AM buildings. These framework plans will be turned over to Howard S. Wright Constructors to identify the costs for all the projects in the buildings.

Read or download the February 2011 Board Report including Campus Time lines and Financial Updates – click here


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PCC surpasses goals for energy conservation and efficiency

At campuses and centers throughout the Portland Community College district, the PCC Bond Program is giving the green light to ambitious projects that support the college’s sustainability goals – and then some.

The red buoys at Willow Creek serve double duty as public art and filtering stormwater from the building’s 33,000-square-feet roof. Photo by Josh Partee Photography.

When voters passed the PCC bond measure in 2008, the sustainability commitment for new buildings was to meet LEED Silver standards. A little more than two years, a LEED Platinum-rated building, and a planned net zero building later, it’s clear the PCC Bond Program is exceeding that commitment.

“I think there’s a desire to be a leader,” said PCC’s Sustainability Manager Alexander de Roode. “Especially as a public institution, we have a responsibility to taxpayers and our students, who pay tuition, to go through the due diligence of being environmentally responsible, socially responsible, economically responsible – that’s the triple bottom line of sustainability.”

PCC Managing Architect Grant Bennett for the PCC Bond Program agrees that students and district residents are sending a clear message that conscientious use of resources is high on the list of priorities.

“The desire of our student population and those we serve to see the college as a living, breathing example of sustainable principles is everywhere,” said Bennett. “I call it the groundswell, and the literal embodiment of the groundswell is the President’s Climate Commitment.”

In 2007, PCC District President Preston Pulliams signed the American and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which required the college to create a plan to become carbon neutral. PCC’s Climate Action Plan, which was developed carefully over the course of two years, pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 10% below 2006 levels by 2012, 40% below 2006 levels by 2030 and 80% below 2006 levels by 2050.

When architecture, engineering firms and design firms sign on to do bond program projects, they must take this commitment into consideration. “Many of them, if not all refer to our Climate Action Plan to see how they can align their design to help us meet these goals,” said de Roode.

The results, so far, have been impressive to say the least. Some accomplishments of the Bond Program include:

A new center on the “Path to Net Zero”

Bond Project Manager Gary Sutton names Newberg Center as his favorite “green” project. “It is a 13,000-square-foot building on pace for LEED Platinum and is also a Path to Net Zero building,” said Sutton. As one of fifteen participants in the Energy Trust of Oregon’s Path to Net Zero pilot program, Newberg Center has a goal of achieving net-zero on-site building energy use. The building has already won an award for sustainable design.

 

A comprehensive, district-wide solar assessment

Recently, the BacGen Solar Group and Oh planning+design, a woman-owned architectural firm, won the contract to conduct a district-wide solar feasibility study to figure out the best option for using solar energy in Bond Program projects. By law, new public buildings or major renovations in Oregon must include a certain amount of solar energy technology.

“The assessment will state in a methodical way where our opportunities for solar voltaic may be,” explained Bennett. Also on the table is the question of whether or not the PCC Bond Program can combine the requirements for each individual project into one district-wide effort that would save as much or more energy.

 

The array will be owned, operated and maintained by SolarCity. The college will have the option to purchase it after 20 years.

The array will be owned, operated and maintained by SolarCity. The college will have the option to purchase it after 20 years.

 

LEED Platinum certification of the new Willow Creek Center

Among a long list of sustainable features, Willow Creek Center boasts 75 percent water savings due to water-efficient fixtures and 37 percent in energy cost savings, thanks to such energy savers as roof-mounted solar photovoltaic panels.

The sustainably renovated Downtown Center

The PCC Downtown Center is easily accessible by light rail and meets the highest standards for sustainability and energy efficiency for a remodeled building. For example, about 50 percent of the wood products in the building were harvest from sustainably managed forests.

Upgrades that will lower PCC Sylvania’s energy bill by 30 percent

The new dehumidification system at Sylvania Campus takes heat from the swimming pool area and transfers it to the water, thereby heating the pool and reducing the strain in the campus boiler system. The new dehumidification system will lower annual energy costs by an estimated $475,800. Similarly, a new boiler heating system will reduce heat costs and carbon emissions.

The E6 Plan for a net zero Sylvania Campus

The innovative PCC E6 plan will upgrade the campus to address climate change, environmental stewardship and green workforce development with an ultimate goal of a net zero campus – meaning all the energy demands are met with energy generated on site. The six Es in “E6” stand for:

  • Energy creation;
  • Energy and natural resource conservation;
  • Environmental stewardship;
  • Employment stimulus;
  • Education to prepare workers for green jobs; and
  • Effective and efficient use of project funds.

These are just a handful of the projects that are helping PCC become more energy efficient, while giving students a front-row seat to new sustainable technologies and best practices. Sustainability upgrades and additions will be included in the plans for Southeast Center and Cascade Campus, which are still in early phases of community engagement and bond planning, and Rock Creek Campus, which just recently approved an option for campus redesign.

“The Bond Program is committed to sustainability for all our projects, whether we go through LEED certification or not. We continue to look for ways to conserve energy, water and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and be better stewards of the environment,” said Linda Degman, Associate Director for the PCC Bond Program.

PCC surpasses goals for energy conservation and efficiency

At campuses and centers throughout the Portland Community College district, the PCC Bond Program is giving the green light to ambitious projects that support the college’s sustainability goals – and then some.

When voters passed the PCC bond measure in 2008, the sustainability commitment for new buildings was to meet LEED Silver standards. A little more than two years, a LEED Platinum-rated building, and a planned net zero building later, it’s clear the PCC Bond Program is exceeding that commitment.

“I think there’s a desire to be a leader,” said PCC’s Sustainability Manager Alexander de Roode. “Especially as a public institution, we have a responsibility to taxpayers and our students, who pay tuition, to go through the due diligence of being environmentally responsible, socially responsible, economically responsible – that’s the triple bottom line of sustainability.”

PCC Managing Architect Grant Bennett for the PCC Bond Program agrees that students and district residents are sending a clear message that conscientious use of resources is high on the list of priorities.

“The desire of our student population and those we serve to see the college as a living, breathing example of sustainable principles is everywhere,” said Bennett. “I call it the groundswell, and the literal embodiment of the groundswell is the President’s Climate Commitment.”

In 2007, PCC District President Preston Pulliams signed the American and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which required the college to create a plan to become carbon neutral. PCC’s Climate Action Plan, which was developed carefully over the course of two years, pledges to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050.

When architecture, engineering firms and design firms sign on to do bond program projects, they must take this commitment into consideration. “Many of them, if not all refer to our Climate Action Plan to see how they can align their design to help us meet these goals,” said de Roode.

The results, so far, have been impressive to say the least. Some accomplishments of the Bond Program include:

A new center on the “Path to Net Zero”

Bond Project Manager Gary Sutton names Newberg Center as his favorite “green” project. “It is a 13,000-square-foot building on pace for LEED Platinum and is also a Path to Net Zero building,” said Sutton. As one of fifteen participants in the Energy Trust of Oregon’s Path to Net Zero pilot program, Newberg Center has a goal of achieving net-zero onsite building energy use. The building has already won an award for sustainable design.

A comprehensive, district-wide solar assessment

Recently, the BacGen Solar Group and Oh planning+design, a woman-owned architectural firm, won the contract to conduct a district-wide solar feasibility study to figure out the best option for using solar energy in Bond Program projects. By law, new public buildings or major renovations in Oregon must include a certain amount of solar energy technology.

“The assessment will state in a methodical way where our opportunities for solar voltaic may be,” explained Bennett. Also on the table is the question of whether or not the PCC Bond Program can combine the requirements for each individual project into one district-wide effort that would save as much or more energy.

 

LEED Platinum certification of the new Willow Creek Center

Among a long list of sustainable features, Willow Creek Center boasts 75 percent water savings due to water-efficient fixtures and 37 percent in energy cost savings, thanks to such energy savers as roof-mounted solar photovoltaic panels. Learn more.

The sustainably renovated Downtown Center

The PCC Downtown Center is easily accessible by light rail and meets the highest standards for sustainability and energy efficiency for a remodeled building. For example, about 50 percent of the wood products in the building were harvest from sustainably managed forests. Learn more.

Upgrades that will lower PCC Sylvania’s energy bill by 30 percent

The new dehumidification system at Sylvania Campus takes heat from the swimming pool area and transfers it to the water, thereby heating the pool and reducing the strain in the campus boiler system. The new dehumidification system will lower annual energy costs by an estimated $475,800. Similarly, a new boiler heating system will reduce heat costs and carbon emissions.

The E6 Plan for a net zero Sylvania Campus

The innovative PCC E6 plan will upgrade the campus to address climate change, environmental stewardship and green workforce development with an ultimate goal of a net zero campus – meaning all the energy demands are met with energy generated on site. The six Es in “E6” stand for:

  • Energy creation;
  • Energy and natural resource conservation;
  • Environmental stewardship;
  • Employment stimulus;
  • Education to prepare workers for green jobs; and
  • Effective and efficient use of project funds.

These are just a handful of the projects that are helping PCC become more energy efficient, while giving students a front-row seat to new sustainable technologies and best practices. Sustainability upgrades and additions will be included in the plans for Southeast Center and Cascade Campus, which are still in early phases of community engagement and bond planning, and Rock Creek Campus, which just recently approved an option for campus redesign.

“The Bond Program is committed to sustainability for all our projects, whether we go through LEED certification or not. We continue to look for ways to conserve energy, water and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and be better stewards of the environment,” said Linda Degman, Associate Director for the PCC Bond Program.

Rock Creek Faculty Ensure Voices are Heard for Campus Improvements

Following voters’ approval of the PCC bond measure in 2008, leaders at Rock Creek challenged themselves to develop a planning process that fully involved campus stakeholders in creating a campus design that effectively meets the needs of Rock Creek students, faculty and staff.

Shannon Baird is a member of the Rock Creek Campus Bond Internal Steering Committee (BISC) and Co-Chair of the Building Construction Technology Department at Rock Creek Campus

Though many volunteered, two faculty members took on a major leadership role:  Shannon Baird, Department Co-Chair for Building Construction Technology and Walter Morales, Department Chair for the Computer Science Department.  Both faculty members signed up early to serve on the Bond Internal Steering Committee (BISC), a group comprised of Rock Creek Campus President, David Rule, deans, managers, faculty, staff and district leadership.

While both Baird and Morales are motivated by the opportunity to improve Rock Creek campus, the two stakeholders have approached their charge differently – both with success.  Morales, a soft spoken paragon of patience, explains, in his melodic Brazilian accent that he joined the committee to provide a communications link between campus faculty and the bond program staff.  Baird, on the other hand, views his role as an advocate for Rock Creek staff, faculty and students to understand and participate in the planning process. His philosophy is that, “while the squeaky wheel may not always get the grease, you still have to squeak.”

Walter Morales is a member of the Rock Creek Campus Bond Internal Steering Committee (BISC) and the Chair for the Computer Science Department at Rock Creek

After joining the committee, Morales was drawn to a BISC subcommittee focusing on the design of campus “Spaces and Clusters.”  “Spaces” include designated classrooms, labs, dining halls and student centers; “Clusters” refer to informal spaces – nooks and crannies – where students study or hang out between classes.  “I have seen good and bad classroom setups, and I wanted the Computer Science Department to have a say,” Morales said. Morales admits he has never been involved with such a large project before. “I had no idea what the process and outcome were going to be.” Initially he was overwhelmed by the complex nature of topics such as building placement, surface water runoff and traffic flow, to name a few. “I thought we would just be building buildings. It was very interesting,” he conceded.

Baird knew differently. With his architectural background and construction experience, his learning curve was less steep. Baird’s expertise helped him embrace the process, engage with the bond project manager, Opsis Architecture and other campus constituents, and narrow the divide between experts and stakeholders.  “I see my role as helping the campus communities find their voice, and then, helping them scream.” Early on, Baird posted flyers around campus announcing bond meetings and activities.  Later in the process, he supplemented outreach conducted by Opsis and the bond team by presenting program option diagrams to department chairs for building 7, where much of the construction will take place.  In each case, Baird explained various design options proposed by the  team and the committee. “That helped the bond team get enough people participating to get a good sample,” said Baird.

Morales led a different type of outreach by hosting informal drop-in sessions the last week of fall term (2010), which primarily attracted Rock Creek faculty.  He also successfully engaged the Faculty Federation, a union that represents full-time and part-time faculty, in the planning discussion.  The Federation has drawn attention to issues facing Rock Creek faculty, such as part-time instructors’ need for more space.  Another example Morales recalled:  “An  instructor came to me to say he has transgender students who do not know where to change clothes for his class. I brought this information to the attention of the committee.”  Serving as an effective conduit between faculty and the design team has positioned Morales as a valuable point person for those who will be directly affected by campus construction, program and classroom placement.

Thanks in large part to the efforts of Baird and Morales, an increasing number of campus stakeholders will participate in the next phase of planning and design. The campus bond project team is recruiting people to serve on newly formed committees addressing topics such as the West Campus Zone, learning spaces, career technical programs, health and wellness, student development and interfaces, multidisciplinary and campus climate.

“Committee work has allowed people to develop ideas and build on each others’ ideas,” said Baird.  For instance, “No one thought we’d be renovating building 7 again, but when we started looking at it in terms of parking, energy used, building toward the center of campus and usability of the quad space . . . it made sense.  I have fielded several questions about the loss of the building 7 atrium, which uses more energy than any other room in the district. I was able to talk to the architects as one voice, to let them know how important it will be to recreate that experience in the new building.”

As Morales sees it, “Rock Creek is our home. We want to have a say in what our home will look like.”

Roadtrip and research to improve Cascade’s Student Center

Cascade Campus staff and student leaders toured Chemeketa Community College’s Student Union building in Salem, Oregon, last December to research other campuses for remodeling or replacing Cascade’s Student Center Building as part of the PCC Bond Program.

The Student Union Building at Chemeketa Community College in Salem, Oregon

Many Cascade Campus students and staff have cited Chemeketa’s Student Union Building as a good example of incorporating a dedicated program room for students and a suite of flexible space that is assigned on an as-needed basis.  Kendi Esary, the Student Leadership Coordinator at Cascade Campus, organized the tour.

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